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Home arrow Marketing arrow Value-ology: Aligning sales and marketing to shape and deliver profitable customer value propositions
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Ask Your Sales Team to Be Involved

Salespeople can be very protective of their customers, controlling what information the customer receives/hears about your company. But we have noticed that the most successful salespeople recognise that sales is a whole-company effort and will not ignore a request from their marketing team to get on the phone or meet their customers. In fact, they will welcome it, as it means they’ll likely learn something they haven’t thought to ask their customer.

Analyse Data from All Sources

There’s no use in gathering data if you simply aren’t doing anything with it. We’ve covered extensively the tools and methods you can use to gather data, but don’t forget the purpose of all this data is to help you make informed decisions. Carve out time to regularly review internal reports and third-party information in order to identify trends, themes and patterns.

Implement a Process to Conduct Win-Loss Analysis

Does your company formally review every new or lost sale? Without conducting a win/loss analysis, you are left with mere speculation as to why the customer chose (or didn’t choose) your solution. Our advice is to formalise the programme internally in order to get into the habit of collecting valuable customer data and form a long-term view when it is fresh in the minds of sales. Companies often get stuck in short-term thinking, and ultimately never gain a complete picture as to why their customers do business with them! For example, one firm we met with recently lost a big bid. When the Propositions Manager asked the sales team to get involved in a ‘loss’ discussion, they shrugged their shoulders and said ‘On to the next one’.

Further Reading

Bandler, R., & Grinder, J. (1979). Frogs into princes. Moab: Real People Press.

Braun, V., & Clarke, V. (2006). Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3(2), 77—101.

Ham, S. H. (1992). Environmental interpretation: A practical guide for people with big ideas and small budgets. Golden: North American Press.

Ham, S. H., & Weller, B. (2004). Diffusion and adoption of thematic interpretation at an interpretive historic site. UNSWAnnals of Leisure Research, 7(1), 1—1.

Levitt, T. (1960). Marketing myopia. Harvard Business Review, 38, 24—47.

Portigal, S. (2013). Interviewing users: How to uncover compelling insights. Brooklyn: Rosenfeld Media.

Webster, F. E. (2002b). Market-driven management: How to define, develop, and deliver customer value (2nd ed.). Hoboken: Wiley.

 
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