Buyer Motivations in More Detail

Achievement factors

• Likes to set realistic challenges and get things done.

• Is systematic in his/her approach to tasks.

• Is business-like and likes dealings to be to the point.

• Takes great pride in a completed task.

• Is good at taking risks.

• Actively plans his/her own development and progression.

• Looks forward to performance reviews.

• Likes to set measurable targets.

• Does not work well under close supervision.

• Enjoys new learning situations.

Influence factors

• Enjoys a good debate and likes competing with people.

• Likes to take the lead in situations.

• Likes to have a high profile at work.

• Quickly forms an opinion and persuades others of its correctness.

• Is concerned about the status he/she has.

• Will volunteer for leading positions.

• Takes every opportunity to present ideas to management himself/ herself.

• Enjoys recognition publicly for what he/she has done successfully.

• Likes to act as a representative or spokesperson for a group.

• Tends to dominate conversations with his/her own views.

Affiliation factors

• Tends to be non-assertive and warm.

• Is visibly disturbed by indifference and avoids cool or cold people.

• Will begin conversations with a non-business-related discussion.

• Is actively concerned about the happiness of others at work.

• Actively seeks the company of other people.

• Avoids conflict with others if possible.

• Works hard to keep the conversation going and dislikes silence.

• Works hard to create warm personal relationships.

• Prefers to work in group situations.

• Shows sympathy to those who are less fortunate.

Security factors

• Is concerned about how others regard him/her.

• Is concerned that others see him/her as effective at work.

• Is cautious about changes which will affect him/her.

• Tends to set targets which can be comfortably met.

• Tends to react to others opinions rather than initiate them himself/ herself.

• Waits until he/she knows people well before introducing his/her ideas.

• Tends to play safe when making decisions.

• Is concerned about the organisation's financial soundness.

• Lacks self-confidence.

• Reacts badly to criticism.

A guide to dealing with these motivations is shown in Table 2.3 below.

For an exercise on buyer profiling that has been used to profile many suppliers, see Appendix 2.

Table 2.3 A Guide to Dealing with Different Buyer Motivations

Achievement

Affiliation

Influence

Security

Praise in writing

Make sure social chat comes before business

Let the Client change your proposal if necessary

Sell the benefits of change

Comment on his/ her certificates and trophies

Don't refuse the offer of tea or coffee

Emphasise how your proposal will affect status

Keep things in black and white - avoid grey areas

Emphasise things that will beat his/her competitors

Share an interest in his/her family/social life

Ask for his/her suggestions

Make your proposal easy to buy - nothing too risky

Keep things clear -don't be vague

Have regular informal meetings

Let him/her lead the discussions

Regular

communication to inform/reassure

Show interest in personal career goals

Assist in selling proposal to his/her boss

Recognise his/her valuable contributions

Encourage, praise and thank regularly

Build measurable goals into the proposal

Don't be critical of others in front of him/her

Let the Client steal your ideas

Offer testimonials or referrals

Source: Marketing Improvements Group.

TRACKING BUYER MOTIVATIONS

Imagine that you are meeting a director in a large corporate entity who is interested in buying your firm's services. Your proposed approach would involve many changes for successful implementation. During the meeting the director appears resistant to introducing new processes and is concerned about how he will be seen in his company as champion of change.

You discover that the director is keen for his company to lead the market and is seeking advantages over his peers. When you have established his key issues, you suggest a process which he seems to find appealing. He agrees in principle and wants to make a few changes to the proposal layout. In fact he says that he will put a few of your points to his CEO this afternoon.

He is also concerned whether your ideas have worked elsewhere and needs reassurance. Finally he suggests that you meet over dinner in a few weeks' time to review how the proposal has been received by his colleagues.

This example contains a mixture of buyer motivations. Using the guide enables the selection of appropriate actions. See highlighted areas in Table 2.4.

Table 2.4 Using the Buyer Motivations Guide

Achievement

Affiliation

Influence

Security

Praise in writing

Make sure social chat comes before business

Let the Client change your proposal if necessary

Sell the benefits of change

Comment on his/ her certificates and trophies

Don't refuse the offer of tea or coffee

Emphasise how your proposal will affect status

Keep things in black and white - avoid grey areas

Emphasise things that will beat their competitors

Share an interest in his/ her family/social life

Ask for his/her suggestions

Make your proposal easy to buy - nothing too risky

Keep things clear -don't be vague

Have regular informal meetings

Let him/her lead the discussions

Regular communication to inform/reassure

Show interest in personal career goals

Assist in selling proposal to his/her boss

Recognise his/ her valuable contributions

Encourage, praise and thank regularly

Build measurable goals into the proposal

Don't be critical of others in front of him/her

Let the Client steal your ideas

Offer testimonials or referrals

 
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