Summary

This chapter has highlighted the constraints and limitations of current knowledge of prosocial behaviour resulting from the overall laboratory-based, quantitative and allegedly neutral experimental approach of mainstream social psychology. I have argued that a critical approach can contribute to making psychological insights into prosocial behaviour more applicable to the complexities of real-life behaviour and dilemmas in a modern globalised world.

Key References

Cohen, S. (2001). States of Denial: Knowing about atrocities and suffering. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Kegan, J. (2002). Morality, altruism, and love. In: Post, S.G., Underwood, L.G., Schloss, J.P., and W. B. Hurlbut. Altruism and altruistic love. Science, philosophy and religion in dialogue. New York: Oxford University Press.

Post, S.G., Underwood, L.G., Schloss J.P., & Hurlbut, W.B. Altruism and altruistic love. Science, philosophy and religion in dialogue. Oxford University Press

Reicher, S., Hopkins, N., & Levine, M. (2006). Saving Bulgaria’s Jews: An analysis of social identity and the mobilisation of social solidarity. European journal of social psychology 36, 49—72

Seu, I.B. (2013). Passivity generation; human rights and everyday morality. London: Palgrave McMillan

 
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