Table of Contents:

Summary

Some basic principles are listed in the table below.

Five Principles of Safety

  • 1. All accidents are preventable.
  • 2. All levels of management are responsible for safety.
  • 3. All employees have the responsibility to themselves, their coworkers, and their family to work safely.
  • 4. In order to eliminate accidents, management must ensure that all employees are properly trained on how to perform every job task safely and efficiently. Knowledge is the key to safety.
  • 5. Every employee must be involved in every area of the safety and production process. People like to be involved in the decisions that affect them.

Safety awareness is not automatically attributed to the work force. It must be carefully developed if we truly care. Safety doesn't happen by accident. Accidents hurt—safety doesn't.

Further Readings

Reese, C.D. Accident/Incident Prevention Techniques (Second Edition). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group, 2011.

Reese, C.D. Occupational Health and Safety Management: A Practical Approach (Third Edition). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group, 2016.

Reese, C.D. and J.V. Eidson. Handbook of OSHA Construction Safety & Health (Second Edition). Boca Raton, FL: CRC/Taylor & Francis Group, 2006.

Saskatchewan Labour. Identifying and Assessing Safety Hazards. http://www.labour.gov.sk.ca/safety, 2007.

United States Department of Labor. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Office of Training and Education. OSHA Voluntary Compliance Outreach Program: Instructors Reference Manual. Des Plaines, IL: US Department of Labor, 1993.

United States Department of Labor. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Field Inspection Reference Manual (FIRM): OSHA Instruction CPL 2.103. Washington, DC. September 26, 1994.

 
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