Mastery Self-talk

The variance in mastery self-talk explained by the motivational beliefs was 33.7 %, which was significant (Д4548) = 69.607, p = .000). As reported in Table 5.2, the motivational beliefs of English-learning goal orientations and English self-efficacy explained more of the variance in students’ use of mastery self-talk than any of the other motivational regulation strategies. Mastery goal orientation was a strong predictor for mastery self-talk (в = .379, p = .000). As expected, students with a greater mastery goal orientation also had a stronger tendency to use mastery self-talk to maintain or increase their effort and persistence at English learning tasks than students who did not tend to adopt mastery goals. In addition, self-efficacy was also a strong predictor for mastery self-talk (в = .251, p = .000), indicating that students who exhibited high levels of self-efficacy for English learning tended to use the strategy of mastery self-talk more frequently. Surprisingly, performance-avoidance goal orientation was also an individual predictor of students’ use of mastery self-talk = .140, p = .001). This result is inconsistent with the findings of previous studies on performance-avoidance goal orientation. Performance-avoidance goals have been associated with a motivational, affective, cognitive, and behavioral pattern that is harmful to learning and motivation (Pintrich, 2000). Wolters and Rosenthal (2000) also found performance-goal orientation could not significantly predict the use of mastery self-talk. In the present study, performance-avoidance goal orientation was found to be a significant predictor of mastery self-talk, while performance-approach goal orientation could not significantly predict the use of mastery self-talk.

 
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