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Home arrow Health arrow Best practices for environmental health : environmental pollution, protection, quality and sustainability
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Asbestos

(See specific indoor air pollutants in Chapter 2, “Air Quality (Outdoor [Ambient] and Indoor)”)

Additional Best Practices for Asbestos

  • • Do not remove asbestos sheeting unless it is broken or damaged.
  • • Do not use power tools or abrasive materials on asbestos surfaces.
  • • Clean the surface of asbestos material carefully and to not use high water pressure equipment.
  • • Wet asbestos materials before removing them.

Biological Hazards

(See specific indoor air pollutants in Chapter 2, “Air Quality (Outdoor [Ambient] and Indoor)”)

Biologic and Infectious Wastes

  • (See Chapter 12, “Solid Waste, Hazardous Materials, and Hazardous Waste Management”) Carbon Monoxide
  • (See specific indoor air pollutants in Chapter 2, “Air Quality (Outdoor [Ambient] and Indoor)”) Chemical Hazards
  • (See Household Products in the Sub-Problems, Factors Leading to Impairment, and Best Practices for Indoor Air Quality section in Chapter 2, “Air Quality (Outdoor [Ambient] and Indoor)”)

Debris

(See endnote 52)

Note: The removal and disposal of debris varies enormously from one disaster situation to another and is also extremely complex depending on the composition of the material and the ability of communities to handle large volumes within reasonable traveling distances, especially when there are already existing problems of solid and hazardous waste disposal. The discussion below will be limited for this reason.

Typically, the removal of the debris is a substantial item in the budget of all communities involved in disasters. Large quantities of trees, shrubs, sediment, soil, rubble from structures, metal, concrete, and asphalt need to be hauled away to disposal sites or for recycling purposes.

There is an increased potential for hazardous waste generation and special techniques are needed for removal and disposal. Some of the potentially hazardous materials include asbestos found in fire proofing, thermal and acoustical insulation, flooring tiles, and roofing material; pool chemicals, household chemicals, fertilizers and pesticides, and contaminated prescriptions; tires, batteries, and automobiles; explosives including ammunition, fireworks, and explosive chemicals; metal or plastic fuel containers, pressurize gas cylinders and underground storage tanks; electrical transformers utilizing PCBs; air-conditioning equipment utilizing Freon; containers of chemicals and various petroleum compounds; medical waste; radioactive wastes; etc.

 
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