About the Contributors

Kelly C. Berg, PhD, is a postdoctoral fellow with the Midwest Regional Postdoctoral Training Program in Eating Disorders Research and director of assessment for the Eating Disorders Research Program at the University of Minnesota. She received her doctorate in counseling psychology at the University of Minnesota after completing her predoctoral internship at the University of Chicago Medical School. Her research interests include the assessment and diagnosis of eating disorders as well as the development of innovative treatments for reducing binge eating and compensatory behaviors (Chapter 5).

Ioana Boie, PhD, is an assistant professor of counseling at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia. Her clinical, research, and advocacy interests have revolved around treatment of eating disorders and body image, particularly related to multicultural issues. Other interests include clinical supervision, social justice, and immigration issues (Chapter 18).

Frances A. Bono, MA, has been a practicing registered dietitian for 16 years. Currently, she works as a health educator at Kaiser Permanente Hospital at the Panorama City Medical Center, Panorama City, California. Among her roles is to provide nutrition therapy to Kaiser members with eating disorders. She has also worked as a nutrition consultant for the Manick Program in Woodland Hills, California, an intensive outpatient treatment program for eating disorders, and for Clear view Treatment Programs in Westwood, California. Bono holds a Master of Arts in psychology from California State University, Los Angeles (Chapter 12).

Kerri N. Boutelle, PhD, is the psychological services and training director and director of behavioral services, Weight and Wellness Clinic, and associate professor of pediatrics and psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego. Boutelle has been working with youths and young adults who have weight- or eating-related issues for more than 12 years. Boutelle is the director of behavioral services of the Weight and Wellness Clinic, a clinic for youths (and their families) who struggle with their weight and leads parenting groups and provides individual and family therapy Boutelle also sees patients in the eating disorders program for family-based and individual treatment of anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, and eating disorder not otherwise specified. Boutelle's current research is focused on parenting children to reduce weight, parent and child skills for reducing binge eating, and epidemiological studies regarding adolescents who have been successful in weight loss (Chapter 15).

Douglas Bunnell, PhD, FAED, CEDS, is vice president of the Renfrew Center Foundation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and editor of the Renfrew Center s professional journal Perspectives. Bunnell is a fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders and a founder and past president of the National Eating Disorders Association. He is also a clinical advisor to the National Eating Disorders Association Navigator Program, which provides peer-to-peer support for families coping with eating disorders. A coeditor, with Margo Maine and Beth McGilley, of Treatment of Eating Disorders: Bridging the Research Practice Gap (Academic Press, 2012), Bunnell maintains a private practice in Westport, CT (Chapter 2).

Fary M. Cachelin, PhD, received her Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Stanford University in 1988 and her doctorate in psychology from Harvard University in 1996. She has authored numerous publications on eating problems in ethnic minority populations and has received federal funding for her research to develop accessible treatments for Latinas with eating disorders. She currently is professor and chair of psychology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (Chapter 12).

Jennifer Maskell Carney, PhD, LPC, NCC, is an assistant professor of counselor education at Argosy University, Washington, DC. She has authored several articles on eating disorders advocacy and intervention and previously served as the coordinator for Eating Disorder Services at the University of Virginia Womens Center (Chapter 6).

Caitlin Chun-Kennedy, MS, is a doctoral student in counseling psychology at Pennsylvania State University. She has copublished several articles on college student mental health, most recently “Do Double Minority Students Face Double Jeopardy? Testing Minority Stress Theory” (Journal of College Counseling, 2011, with Jeffrey Hayes, Astrid Edens, and Benjamin Locke) (Chapter 1).

Elizabeth Cotter, PhD, is a postdoctoral research fellow at Virginia Commonwealth University. Her primary areas of interest include obesity prevention, eating disorders, and vocational psychology. She is particularly interested in the development of culturally sensitive obesity interventions that promote healthy eating and weight-related behaviors (Chapter 8).

Anita Federici, PhD, is a clinician and researcher in the Eating Disorder Programs at Credit Valley Hospital in Mississauga, Ontario, and St. Joseph's Healthcare in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. She also serves as a research consultant and collaborator for the Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders, in Beachwood, Ohio. She has expertise in the application of dialectical behavior therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy for patients with multidiagnostic eating disorder presentations, particularly those with comorbid borderline personality disorder and suicidal or self-injurious behaviors. Federici provides consultation training on dialectical behavior therapy and its adaptation to the treatment of eating disorders. Her work has been published in peer-reviewed journals and book chapters (Chapter 16).

Anthea Fursland, PhD, is principal clinical psychologist at the Centre for Clinical Interventions Eating Disorders Programme in Perth, Western Australia, Australia. She is a fellow of the international Academy for Eating Disorders and president of the Australia and New Zealand Academy for Eating Disorders. She also serves on the steering committee of the National Eating Disorders Collaboration and is a founding member of the Bridges Reference Group, which brings together local stakeholders in the field of eating disorders in Western Australia (Chapter 13).

Rachel W. Gow, PhD, is a research assistant professor in the Psychology Department at Virginia Commonwealth University. Cow's research interests are focused on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of obesity prevention and treatment interventions (Chapter 8).

Tonya Hammer, PhD, LPC-S, is an assistant professor of counseling at the University of Houston – Clear Lake. She has served in state leadership positions as well as national leadership positions within the American Counseling Association. Additionally, she is involved in leadership in an international organization addressing the issues of human dignity and humiliation. Among her presentations and publications are works on humiliation, controlling images, relational-cultural theory, and issues of social justice in counseling (Chapter 18).

Mary A. Hermann, JD, PhD, is an associate professor and chair of the Department of Counselor Education at Virginia Commonwealth University. She is a licensed attorney, a licensed professional counselor, a national certified counselor, and a certified school counselor. She has coedited two books and written numerous articles and book chapters on legal and ethical issues in counseling (Chapter 4).

Kim Hurst, PhD, is a senior psychologist with the Eating Disorder Program, Child and Youth Mental Health Service, on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. Hurst is a founding member of the Eating Disorder Program and has been using Maudsley family-based treatment for the past 4 years. Before this, Hurst was a member of the multidisciplinary Burleigh Child and Youth Mental Health Service Continuing Care Team, Burleigh, Queensland, Australia, where she provided specialist mental health services in the areas of assessment, intervention, and treatment planning. She is currently completing her doctorate and has also published a journal article on family-based therapy for adolescent anorexia (Chapter 17).

Nichole R. Kelly, MS, is a doctoral student in counseling psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University. Kellys research interests include ethnic and cultural variations in eating- and weight-related symptomatology, binge eating etiology and treatment, and neuropsychological contributions to disordered eating (Chapter 8).

Stephanie Knatz, PhD, is an adolescent day treatment program therapist in the Eating Disorders Treatment and Research Program at the University of California, San Diego, Department of Psychiatry. Knatz is an advanced doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at Alliant International University. She currently provides individual, family, and group therapies to adolescents with eating disorders in the Adolescent Day Treatment Program. Her clinical and research work focuses on both eating disorders and pediatric obesity (Chapter 15).

Victoria Kress, PhD, is a clinic director, professor, and coordinator of the clinical mental health, addictions, and college counseling programs at Youngstown State University. She has more than 20 years of clinical experience in various settings including community mental health centers, hospitals, residential treatment facilities, private practice, and college counseling centers (Chapter 18).

Janet A. Lydecker, MS, is a doctoral student in counseling psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University. Her research interests include prevention and treatment of obesity and eating disorders. She is particularly interested in cognitive and cultural factors related to the development and maintenance of eating problems (Chapter 8).

Margo Maine, PhD, FAED, CEDS, cofounder of the Maine & Weinstein Specialty Group, is a clinical psychologist who has specialized in eating disorders and related issues for nearly 30 years. She is coeditor, with Beth McGilley and Douglas Bunnell, of Treatment of Eating Disorders: Bridging the Research-Practice Gap (Elsevier, 2010) and, with William Davis and Jane Shure, of Effective Clinical Practice in the Treatment of Eating Disorders: The Heart of the Matter (Routledge, 2009) and is author, with Joe Kelly, of The Body Myth: Adult Women and the Pressure to Be Perfect (Wiley, 2005); Father Hunger: Fathers, Daughters and the Pursuit of Thinness (Gurze, 2004); and Body Wars: Making Peace With Women's Bodies (Gurze, 2000). She is a senior editor of Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention. Maine was a founding member, longtime board member, and vice president of the Eating Disorders Coalition for Research, Policy, and Action; a founding member and fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders; and a member of the Founders Council and past president of the National Eating Disorders Association. Maine is a member of the psychiatry departments at the Institute of Living/Hartford Hospital's Mental Health Network and Connecticut Children's Medical Center, having previously directed their eating disorders programs. Maine is the 2007 recipient of the Lori Irving Award for Excellence in Eating Disorders Awareness and Prevention, given by the National Eating Disorders Association. She lectures nationally and internationally on topics related to the treatment and prevention of eating disorders, female development, and women's health (Chapter 2).

Jodi Manton is a Master of Arts candidate in the Counselor Education program at Louisiana State University. She will graduate in August 2013 and plans to work with members of the military and their families (Chapter 4).

Suzanne E. Mazzeo, PhD, is a professor of psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University. Her research interests are in the areas of obesity and eating disorders. She has a particular interest in understanding more about environmental factors that influence expression of genetic predispositions to eating problems. She is also interested in the role of culture on eating behaviors and in developing culturally competent interventions to promote healthy eating and exercise behaviors (Chapter 8).

Carol B. Peterson, PhD, LPC, received her undergraduate degree from Yale University and her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Minnesota. She is currently a research associate and assistant professor in the Eating Disorders Research Program at the University of Minnesota, where her investigations have focused on the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and obesity. Peterson has authored more than 80 articles and book chapters and has served as an investigator on several federally funded grants. She is also an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota and has a part-time private practice in which she specializes in the treatment of eating disorders (Chapter 5).

Niva Piran, PhD, professor of counseling psychology at the University of Toronto, is the recipient of the 2009 Florence Denmark Distinguished Mentorship Award from the Association of Women in Psychology. Piran's research is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. She is the author of three books, 40 book chapters, and 47 articles in refereed journals and guest editor of four journal special issues on eating disorders (Chapter 9).

Leigh Pottle is a Master of Education candidate in counselor education at Virginia Commonwealth University. She taught high school English in Williamsburg, Virginia, for 10 years and is currently an adjunct professor at Thomas Nelson Community College. She has extensive experience working with athletes at the high school level (Chapter 4).

Shelly Read, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and senior clinician working in the Eating Disorders Program, Child and Youth Mental Health Service, on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. Since 2000, she has worked in various settings within mental health in London, England; Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia; and the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. The majority of her clinical experience has been acquired through Child and Adolescent Mental Health, as both a clinician and team leader. Read has been specializing in the field of eating disorders for the past 5 years across two different eating disorder programs, providing specialist assessment and treatment to clients of all ages and their families. Read has also published journal articles in the areas of mental health recovery and Maudsley family-based treatment for adolescent anorexia (Chapter 17).

Justine Reel, PhD, LPC, CC-AASP, is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Promotion and Education at the University of Utah, a licensed professional counselor in the State of Utah, and a certified sport psychology consultant for college and Olympic athletes. She has treated clients with eating disorders across all levels of care and is currently implementing integrative eating disorder and obesity prevention programs for adolescents and their parents. She coauthored, with Katherine A. Beals, Hidden Faces of Eating Disorders and Body Image (2009; American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance) and was editor of Eating Disorders: Encyclopedia of Causes, Treatment and Prevention (2012; Greenwood), as well as 60 papers and 200 presentations on the topic of eating disorders and body image. She is the founder of and faculty advisor for SPEAK (Students Promoting Eating Disorder Awareness and Knowledge), a student organization at the University of Utah dedicated to promoting positive body image and health (Chapter 11).

Constance Rhodes is the author of Life Inside the “Thin” Cage: A Personal Look Into the Hidden World of the Chronic Dieter and The Art of Being: Reflections on the Beauty and the Risk of Embracing Who We Are (Waterbrook Press, 2003 and 2004, respectively). She is the founder and CEO of FINDINGbalance, Inc., a faith-based nonprofit dedicated to helping people address problematic eating and lifestyle needs. Her FINDINGbalance Web site serves nearly half a million people annually and her annual conference, Hungry for Hope, is the premiere Christian conference for eating disorders and body image issues. Rhodes previously worked in marketing and artist development in the music recording industry (Chapter 7).

Alan M. Schwitzer, PhD, is a licensed psychologist whose research encompasses more than 50 publications examining college and university student health and mental health needs. Schwitzer is a professor of counseling at Old Dominion University and previously worked at Virginia Commonwealth University, the University of Texas at Austin, Tulane University, and James Madison University. He has been editor of the Journal of College Counseling and chair of the American Counseling Associations Council of Journal Editors. Currently he is a department editor of About Campus Magazine and an expert reviewer for the Journal of American College Health and the Journal of College Student Development. He is the author, with Lawrence Rubin, of Diagnosis and Treatment Planning for Mental Health Professionals: A Popular Culture Casebook Approach (Sage, 2012) (Chapter 7).

Heather Lewy Scott, MEd, NCC, is a high school counselor for Fairfax County Public Schools in Virginia (Chapter 6).

Heather Shaw, PhD, trained at the University of Oregon and Arizona State University; she is currently a research associate at the Oregon Research Institute (Chapter 10).

Munyi Shea, PhD, completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Washington and received her doctorate in counseling psychology from Columbia University. She has published numerous journal articles and book chapters on ethnic minority immigrant mental health and on culturally responsive therapy and interventions. She is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at California State University, Los Angeles (Chapter 12).

Linda Smolak, PhD, graduated from Temple University in 1980 and is now Emerita Professor of Psychology at Kenyon College. She has published many articles on body image and eating disorders in children and adolescents. She coedited, with J. K. Thompson, Body Image, Eating Disorders, and Obesity in Youth: Assessment, Prevention, and Treatment, 2nd edition (American Psychological Association, 2009) and, with Thomas

F. Cash, Body Image: A Handbook of Science, Practice, and Prevention, 2nd edition (Guilford Press, 2011) (Chapter 1).

Eric Stice, PhD, trained at the University of Oregon, Arizona State University, University of California, San Diego, and Stanford University; he is currently a senior research scientist at the Oregon Research Institute. His program of research focuses on understanding the risk factors for the development of eating disorders, obesity, and depression and the design of prevention programs for these public health problems (Chapter 10).

Regine M. Talleyrand, PhD, is an associate professor in the Counseling and Development Master of Education and Doctoral Programs in the College of Education and Human Development at George Mason University. Talleyrand's professional interests are studying mental and physical health disparities among women of color and developing culturally relevant counseling and vocational interventions for communities that have been underrepresented and underserved. She has published and presented in the areas of eating disorders in African American women, multicultural counseling, career counseling, and advising and mentoring relationships and has served as an ad hoc reviewer for the Journal of Counseling Psychology, The Counseling Psychologist, and the Journal of Black Psychology (Chapter 3).

Marian Tanofsky-Kraff, PhD, is an associate professor of medical and clinical psychology and clinical practicum coordinator at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences. Tanofsky-Kraff studies eating disorders and obesity in children and adolescents. Her research addresses the risks, protective factors, maintenance, and consequences of childhood eating disturbance and overweight, with a particular focus on binge eating and the prevention of excessive weight gain. Currently, she is studying binge eating behaviors in children and adolescents. In addition, she is piloting a psychotherapeutic program to prevent excessive weight in adolescent girls who are at high risk for adult obesity (Chapter 14).

Heather Trepal, PhD, LPC-S, is an associate professor in the Department of Counseling at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Her publications and clinical interests are in the areas of self-injurious behavior, relationships and relational development, gender issues in counseling, counselor preparation, supervision, and the use of technology in counseling and counselor training (Chapter 18).

Heather L. Waldron, BS, graduated summa cum laude from Northwestern University in 2011, with majors in psychology and journalism. She is currently clinical lab supervisor for Denise Wilfley, PhD, at Washington University in St. Louis and plans to pursue a doctorate in clinical psychology, studying treatments for eating and weight disorders (Chapter 14).

Hunna J. Watson, PhD, is senior research scientist at the Centre for Clinical Interventions and senior research psychologist at the eating disorders program at Princess Margaret Hospital for Children in Perth, Western Australia, Australia. She also serves on the steering committee of the National Eating Disorders Collaboration and on the management committee of Bridges, the peak eating disorders body in Western Australia, and is a past recipient of the Australian and New Zealand Academy for Eating Disorders' Peter Beumont Young Investigator Prize (Chapter 13).

Denise E. Wilfley, PhD, is professor of psychiatry, medicine, pediatrics, and psychology and the director of the Weight Management and Eating Disorders Program at Washington University in St. Louis. She has been awarded more than $25 million from the National Institutes of Health for a programmatic line of research examining the causes, prevention, and treatment of eating disorders and obesity among children, adolescents, and adults. She established the clinical significance of binge eating disorder and developed and tested novel interventions for recurrent binge eating and early intervention with eating disorders and obesity. She is the author of the empirically supported interpersonal therapy for binge eating disorder treatment manual and has also published more than 150 articles in the eating disorders and obesity fields (Chapter 14).

Lucene Wisniewski, PhD, FAED, is clinical director and cofounder of the Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders, Beachwood, Ohio, and is an adjunct assistant professor of psychology at Case Western Reserve University. Her research and clinical interests include using empirically founded treatments to inform clinical programs. She provides workshops on the cognitive-behavioral therapy and dialectical behavior therapy treatment of eating disorders nationally and publishes in peer-reviewed journals as well as invited book chapters. Wisniewski has been elected fellow and has served on the board of directors of the Academy for Eating Disorders; she is currently coleader of Academy for Eating Disorders' Borderline Personality Disorder special interest group (Chapter 16).

Deanne Zotter, PhD, is a professor of psychology at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests focus on eating disorders and body image, especially the prevention of disordered eating and negative body image. She is the founder and director of the Sister to Sister Peer Mentor Program for the Prevention of Eating Disorders on the West Chester campus (Chapter 11).

 
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