The Concept of Sustainability and Its Application to Labor Market Policy: A Discussion of Political


SustainabilityThe Evolution of the ConceptThe Limits to GrowthThe Stockholm Conference and the Brundtland CommissionThe Rio Summit in 1992After Rio 1992DefinitionGeneral DefinitionSustainability as a ConceptIntra- and Intergenerational JusticeJustice and FairnessCalculationInstitutions to Further Sustainable DevelopmentCharacteristics of SustainabilitySustainability ModelsThe Pillar ModelsSustainability TriangleSustainability CirclesThe HGF Sustainability ModelThe Dimensions of SustainabilityThe Ecological DimensionThe Economic DimensionPoliticsConsumersCompaniesThe Social DimensionSummaryRealizing Sustainable DevelopmentPast AchievementsCitizensCompaniesPoliticians and Scientific AssessmentStrategies for Sustainable DevelopmentOverviewStrategiesSustainable Development StrategiesSustainable Development RulesSustainability Management in GermanyChallenges in Implementing Sustainable DevelopmentCommunicational ChallengesChallenges in SocietyScientific ChallengesThe Concept of SustainabilityConnecting Fields of ResearchDefining and Measuring (Future) NeedsStructural Political ChallengesInstitutional CollaborationEnforceability of the Sustainability ConceptSelf-Interest of StakeholdersTemporal ConsiderationsCostsCommunicationInternational ChallengesSummarySustainability and LaborThe Importance of LaborLabor Market PolicyLabor Market Policy MeasuresMeasuresPassive Labor Market Policy MeasuresActive Labor Market Policy MeasuresCompany MeasuresMacroeconomic MeasuresLabor Market Policy Measures in GermanySustainable Labor Market PolicyThe Economic Dimension of Sustainable Labor Market PolicyThe Ecological Dimension of Sustainable Labor Market PolicyThe Social Dimension of Sustainable Labor Market PolicyIntragenerational Justice and Sustainable Labor Market PolicySummaryIndicatorsIntroductionBasic Requirements for IndicatorsTypes of IndicatorsSingle Primary Data IndicatorsIndicator SetsAggregated Single IndicesBuilding IndicatorsSustainability IndicatorsThe Applied Use of Indicator SystemsSustainability Indicator Systems in GermanyInternational Sustainability Indicator SystemsWellbeing and Indicator SystemsSummaryEvaluationIntroduction and DefinitionThe Tasks of EvaluationBasic Principles of EvaluationThe Evaluation ProcessEvaluation MethodsTypes and Models of EvaluationChallenges to EvaluationMethodical ChallengesHuman ChallengesPolicy EvaluationEvaluating Labor Market PoliciesLabor Market Policy EvaluationChallenges for the Evaluation of Labor Market PolicyEvaluating SustainabilitySummaryIndicators for the Evaluation of Sustainable Labor Market PolicyCriteria for Sustainability IndicatorsExplanatory AspectsTechnical AspectsMicro-level IndicatorsNet-Costs of the MeasureIntegration of Participants into the Formal Labor MarketQuality-of-Job IndicatorsLong Working HoursCommuting TimeQuality of Work LifeMacro-level IndicatorsInfluence of LMP on Labor ProductivityInfluence of LMP on GDP per CapitaEmployment IndicatorsEmployment RatePrecarious EmploymentLong-term Unemployment RateIncome PovertyEducation IndicatorsAdult Secondary/Tertiary Schooling Attainment LevelLife-long LearningWork Accidents and Occupational IllnessesIncome InequalityNumber of Decent Green Jobs in Green IndustriesSummaryPublication Bibliography
 
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