Notes

  • 1. Best, ‘We Are Virtually at War with Russia’, pp. 206-208, 220. See also: Donald E. Davis and Eugene P. Trani, The First Cold War: The Legacy of Woodrow Wilson in U.S.-Soviet Relations (Columbia, MO, 2002).
  • 2. Robert A. Bickers, ‘The Colony’s Shifting Position in the British Informal Empire in China’, in: Judith M. Brown and Rosemary Foot (eds), Hong Kong’s Transitions, 1842-1997 (Basingstoke, 1997), p. 37.
  • 3. G. Patrick March, Eastern Destiny: Russia in Asia and the North Pacific (Westport, CT, 1996), pp. 118-119.
  • 4. Dong Wang, China’s Unequal Treaties: Narrating National History (Oxford, 2005), pp. 1, 10.
  • 5. Lords, 18 July 1878, Hansard Parliamentary Debates, Third Series, 241, cols 1772-1773.
  • 6. Alastair Kocho-Williams, Russia’s International Relations in the Twentieth Century (London, 2013), p. 36; V. N. Khanna, International R.elations (New Delhi, 2009), p. 252; Inbal Rose, Conservatism and Foreign Policy during the Lloyd George Coalition 1918-1922 (London, 1999), p. 206; Best, ‘We Are Virtually at War with Russia’, p. 208.
  • 7. Michael Kort, The Soviet Colossus: History and Aftermath (New York,
  • 2010), p. 221.
  • 8. Alexander Pantsov, The Bolsheviks and the Chinese R.evolution, 1919-1927 (London, 2013), pp. 48, 51; Best, ‘We Are Virtually at War with Russia’,

p. 208.

  • 9. Best, ‘We Are Virtually at War with Russia’, pp. 208-209.
  • 10. Chan Lau Kit-ching, From Nothing to Nothing: The Chinese Communist Movement and Hong Kong, 1921-1936 (Hong Kong, 1999), p. 52; Chan Sui-jeung, East River Column: Hong Kong Guerrillas in the Second World War and After (Hong Kong, 2009), p. 19.
  • 11. Bruce A. Elleman, Modern Chinese Warfare, 1795-1989 (London, 2001), pp. 149-150.
  • 12. Chan, From Nothing to Nothing, pp. 4-6.
  • 13. Yiangou, Cyprus in World War II, pp. 15-16, 172n42.
  • 14. Best, ‘We Are Virtually at War with Russia’, pp. 206, 215.
  • 15. Ronald Hyam, Britain’s Declining Empire: The Road to Decolonisation 1918-1968 (Cambridge, 2006), pp. 84-85.
  • 16. Stephen Constantine, The Making of British Colonial Development Policy, 1914-1940 (London, 1984), pp. 228-229.
  • 17. Peristianis, ‘The Rise ofthe Left’, pp. 246-247; Stavros Tombazos, ‘AKEL: Between Nationalism and “Anti-Imperialism”’, in: Ayhan Aktar, Niyazi Kizilyurek, and Umut Ozkirimli (eds), Nationalism in the Troubled Triangle: Cyprus, Greece and Turkey (Basingstoke, 2010), p. 219.
  • 18. Yiangou, Cyprus in World War II, p. 16.
  • 19. Peristianis, ‘The Rise of the Left’, pp. 246-247; Katsourides, The History of the Communist Party in Cyprus, p. 152.
  • 20. JIC(ME), report, ‘The Internal Security Situation in Cyprus’, undated, annex of: JIC(ME), (48)-71 (Final), Internal Security Situation in Cyprus, 25 November 1948, CO537/2639, TNA; Martin Thomas, Violence and Colonial Order: Police, Workers and Protest in the European Colonial Empires, 1918-1940 (Cambridge, 2012), pp. 78-79.
  • 21. Katsourides, The History of the Communist Party in Cyprus, p. 152.
  • 22. ‘The Cyprus Criminal Code, 1828 to 1933’, 16 August 1933, The Cyprus Government Gazette; Yiangou, Cyprus in World War II, p. 16.
  • 23. Miners, Hong Kong under Imperial Rule, pp. 23-26.
  • 24. Constantine, The Making of British Colonial Development Policy, pp. 230-232.
  • 25. Jbid, pp. 232-233.
  • 26. Jbid.
  • 27. Jbid, pp. 240-241; Joanna Lewis, Empire State-Building: War & Welfare in Kenya, 1925-52 (Oxford, 2000), p. 42.
  • 28. Ashley Jackson, The British Empire and the Second World War (London,
  • 2006), p. 1.
  • 29. Michael Havinden and David Meredith, Colonialism and Development: Britain and Its Tropical Colonies, 1950-1960 (London, 1996), pp. 249, 257-258.
  • 30. Steve Tsang, ‘Government and Politics in Hong Kong: A Colonial Paradox’, in: Judith M. Brown and Rosemary Foot (eds), Hong Kong’s Transitions, 1842-1997 (Basingstoke, 1997), p. 69; Suke Wolton, The Loss of White Prestige: Lord Hailey, the Colonial Office and the Politics of Race and Empire in the Second World War (Basingstoke, 2000), pp. 46-48.
  • 31. Hyam, Britain’s Declining Empire, pp. 96-97.
  • 32. Holland, Britain and the Revolt in Cyprus, p. 13.
  • 33. Peristianis, ‘The Rise of the Left’, p. 249.
  • 34. Kent Fedorowich, ‘Decolonization Deferred? The Re-establishment of Colonial Rule in Hong Kong, 1942-45’, The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, 28/3 (2000), pp. 26, 30, 34.
  • 35. Tsang, Democracy Shelved, pp. 13-14.
  • 36. Commons, 13 July 1943, Hansard Parliamentary Debates, Fifth Series [hereafter Hansard], 391, col. 48, 72.
  • 37. Anne Deighton, ‘“The Frozen Front”: The Labour Government, the Division of Germany and the Origins of the Cold War, 1945-7’, International Affairs, 63/3 (1987), p. 452.
  • 38. Kent, British Imperial Strategy, pp. 13, 24.
  • 39. Thanasis D. Sfikas, The British Labour Government and the Greek Civil War 1945-1949: The Imperialism of‘Non-Intervention’ (Keele, 1994), p. 271.
  • 40. Kent, British Imperial Strategy, p. 24; B. R. Kuniholm, The Origins of the Cold War in the Near East: Great Power Conflict and Diplomacy in Iran, Turkey, and Greece (Princeton, 1994), pp. 86, 91-92.
  • 41. Albert Resis, ‘The Churchill-Stalin Secret “Percentages” Agreement on the Balkans, Moscow, October 1944’, The American Historical Review, 83/2 (1978), pp. 369, 372.
  • 42. Yiorghos Leventis, Cyprus: The Struggle for Self-Determination in the 1940s: Prelude to Deeper Crisis (Frankfurt am Main, 2002), p. 134; Wm. Roger Louis, The British Empire in the Middle East, 1945-1951: Arab Nationalism, The United States, and Postwar Imperialism (Oxford, 1998),

pp. 211-212.

  • 43. Chiefs of Staff (COS), report, 18 June 1946, CAB131/3, DO(46)80, in: John Kent (ed.), British Documents on the End of Empire, Series B, Volume 4: Egypt and the Defence of the Middle East. Part 1: 1945-1949 (London, 1998), p. 147.
  • 44. Bridges, report, ‘Imperial Security in the Middle East’, 2 July 1945, CAB66/67/5/1.
  • 45. Anne Deighton, ‘Entente Neo-Coloniale?: Ernest Bevin and the Proposals for an Anglo-French Third World Power, 1945-1949’, Diplomacy & Statecraft, 17/4 (2006), p. 840.
  • 46. Sargent, memorandum, ‘Stocktaking after VE-Day’, 11 July 1945 (revised), FO371/50912, in: Ronald Hyam (ed.), British Documents on the End of Empire, Series A, Volume 2: The Labour Government and the End of Empire 1945-1951. Part II: Economics and International Relations (London, 1992), pp. 297-304.
  • 47. Kent, British Imperial Strategy, pp. 61-62, 69-70; Jamil Hasanli, Stalin and the Turkish Crisis of the Cold War, 1945-1953 (Plymouth, 2011), pp. 89-90.
  • 48. Deighton, The Impossible Peace, pp. 11-12.
  • 49. Heinlein, British Government Policy, pp. 11-15; Hyam, ‘Introduction’, p. 34; Ronald Hyam, ‘Africa and the Labour Government, 1945-1951’, in: Ronald Hyam (ed.), Understanding the British Empire (Cambridge, 2010), p. 249.
  • 50. Heinlein, British Government Policy, pp. 15-19, 23; Hyam, ‘Africa and the Labour Government’, pp. 249-250.
  • 51. Kent, British Imperial Strategy, pp. 98-99.
  • 52. Heinlein, British Government Policy, p. 23; Commons, 13 July 1943, Hansard, 391, col. 48, 72.
 
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