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Home arrow Law arrow Defining Crime: A Critique of the Concept and Its Implication

Defining Crime: A Critique of the Concept and Its Implication


Concerning the Definition of CrimeOrganization of the BookIn SumLet’s Think about CrimeThe Micro DominationThe Impact of MicroassumptionsChoice and CrimeThe Mismeasurement of Crime?In SumWhat Is Crime?The Legal/Criminal-Law Definition of CrimeScientific Objectivity and CriminologyCrime and the Color BlueLimitations to Criminology as a ScienceIs the Criminal Law Objective?Law and PoliticsVariations in the Criminal LawLegal Criteria for CrimeEmpirical Evidence and Public Perception about CrimeExternal InfluencesIn SumCrime and ScienceConceptual and Operational Definitions of CrimeDefining Crime from Outside CriminologyThe Changing Nature of CrimeGeneralizations, Sampling, and the Legal Definition of CrimeSumming up Observations on Objectivity, Validity, Generalizability, and Science with Respect to the Legal Definition of CrimeCrime and the IndividualAre Offenders and Nonoffenders Really That Different?Microlevel Explanations of Crime and the Legal Definition of CrimeEmpirical Identification of EvidenceAre Microlevel Explanations Behavioral or Legal?The Explanation of Crime When Crime Is Defined as a Violation of the Criminal LawWhy Criminology’s Explanation of Crime Is a Problem (on a Microlevel)In SumCrime, the Concept versus Its Measurement as a Violation of the Criminal LawMetaphysics and CriminologyExplicit Microlevel ExplanationsImplicit Microlevel ExplanationsObjectivity and the Definition of Crime ReexaminedThe Nature of Deviance, Crime, and the LawConsciousness, Science, and the LawMeasuring the Legal Definition of Crime and Its ConsequencesIn SumFraming a Definition of CrimeToward Crime Definition 1.0A Relative Definition of CrimeAbsolute Definitions of CrimeToward a Generalizable Definition of CrimeCrimes Disadvantage OthersViolenceDisadvantagePreventing and Affecting Health and LivelihoodCrimes That Occur to Take Possession by Force or TrickeryForceTrickery and DeceptionExpropriationHuman Rights and StatesStates and Citizens as VictimsIn SumConcerns with the Explanation of CrimeHypotheses Are Rarely RejectedTesting Crime or Lawmaking?Considering History and CrimeThe Convenience of Crime DataIn Sum
 
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