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Did Karl Marx write regularly for Horace Greeley’s New York Tribune?

Yes, he did. He contributed 350 columns between 1853 and 1861 and he coauthored another dozen with his comrade Friedrich Engels (who solo-authored 125 himself). This all began when Tribune editor Charles Dana was traveling in Germany in 1848 and met Marx in Cologne. He must have been impressed with Marx, who was already well known for the pamphlet he and Engels had just published, The Communist Manifesto. Several years later, Dana invited Marx to write about the impact of the revolutions of 1848 in Europe on Germany and this would lead to the sustained relationship with the Tribune. Marx ended his relationship with the Tribune a decade later when Dana left the paper; the paper became less staunchly abolitionist, and the American Civil War left American readers less interested in European affairs than before.

A century later, President Kennedy would speak to the American Newspaper Publishers Association, reminding them that an American publisher had once employed Karl Marx, communism's founding father. Marx complained frequently about the low salary the Tribune paid and Kennedy suggested, in jest, that if the stingy publisher of the Tribune had only paid Marx better, a great deal of unpleasantness with communism might have been avoided.

The vast majority of Marx's columns concern European political affairs. They are Marx's own observations, none of them based on discussions or interviews with sources in positions of power (or any other sources). That was the normal journalism of the day.

 
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