Messy First Layer

The Problem

This is another common 3D-printing issue faced by many users. The first layers of printing are always troublesome. Problems are usually a non-stick print, or the bottom shell has an incorrect look due to unwanted lines. Also, instead of getting a fine detail on the bottom of your print, you find a blurry, congealed design that doesn’t look like a surface design (Figure 8.9).

The Cause

The blurred and undefined detail on your print simply means that the temperature of the printing bed is too high. Unwanted lines arise as a result of the nozzle and the bed being too far away, blobs occur if the nozzle is too close to the bed. In addition, a non-stick print is the product of a bed that has not been properly leveled.

The Solution

Reduce the temperature of the bed and by lowering the temperature by five degrees at a time; continue to reduce the temperature until the desired adhesion result is achieved without losing any detail.

Elephant’s Foot

The Problem

Elephant’s foot is a 3D-printing term that corresponds to the outward bulge of the base of the model. Simply put, it’s when the printing bows or curves at the bottom (Figure 8.10).

The Cause

This usually happens when the weight of the model is pressing down on its base before it cools back to solid.

The Solution

Another 3D-printing troubleshooting tip you can use is to ensure that the base layers are cool enough to support the top structure. You need to make sure that the cooling is just the right level, since too much cooling causes the base layers to be warped. You might find this part tricky, but the easiest way to do this 3D-printing troubleshooting process is to lower the printing platform’s temperature by 5°C intervals to about plus or minus 25°C of the recommended temperature. If the bottom/top thickness is set to 0.6 mm, you can start the fan at a height slightly lower than that.

Print Looks Deformed and Melted

The Problem

This issue is one of the most frequently asked questions in our 3D-printing FAQ. The filament has a highly resilient feature of all forms of misconfiguration, which makes it difficult for users to identify when the hot-end of their 3D printer is overheating. You just notice uneven layers, and when you take a closer look at the cabin, you’ll see that the model is melted while you get something on the chimney that’s close to the wax that’s melted down the candle (Figure 8.11).

The Cause

The cause of the problem is an overheated hot-end. The temperature of your printer needs to be properly balanced to allow the filament to flow well and to allow' it to solidify quickly. The balanced temperature will also make it possible to place the next layer on a more solid surface. However, before you adjust the temperature, make sure that the correct material is set up for the printer. If you check the material settings and everything looks fine, then all you might need to do is make a slight adjustment.

The Solution

i. Check if your material settings are correct. Proper material temperature settings range from 180°C to 260°C.

ii. Reduce the hot-end temperature of printer. This can be done with the hot- end temperature settings of software or printer. Reduce the temperature by five degrees Celsius, depending on the temperature recorded.

 
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