Table of Contents:

Looking Forward

As outlined above, the innovative features of the ECCA website provide ample opportunities for researchers inside and outside of the academy. The information and visualizations created also support learning for 4th grade students across California and teaching and learning at colleges and universities. Variations of the primary spatio-temporal interface can be constructed for targeted user groups, specific academic investigations, or new websites with specific functions. ECCA continues to work with its collaborators to create these specialized visualizations. While our efforts have initially focused on serving the educational needs of California’s 300,000 fourth-grade students learning about California history each year, we believe that our site will ultimately have a national presence through our partnership with organizations like the National Center for History in the Schools. The ECCA team will continue to meet with Native groups, such as the Ohlone Tribe, the Kizh Gabrieleno, the Tongva Gabrielino, the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians (Acjachemen Nation), and the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians, to disseminate the ECCA and help incorporate its visualizations into the Tribes’ educational programs and museums. Ultimately, we hope that the ECCA—like all developing digital humanities projects engaged in historical mapping—will foster new research and understandings about Indigenous history in California and beyond.

Notes

  • 1 For California Native language recovery and the monumental efforts of John P. Harrington, see Hinton, Leanne. Flutes of Fire: Essays on California Indian Languages. Berkeley: Hevday Books, 1994.
  • 2 See website: https://www.latimes.com/projects/la-me-tongva-map/.
  • 3 Curwen, Thomas. “Tongva, Los Angeles’ First Language, Opens the Door to a Forgotten Time and Place.” Los Angeles Times (May 12, 2019).
  • 4 For Tongva cultural geography, see McCawley, William. The First Angelinos: The Gabrielino Indians of Los Angeles. Malki Museum Press, 1996.
  • 5 See Hackel, Steven W., Natale Zappia and Jeanette Zerkneke. The Early California Cultural Atlas, http://ecai.org/ecca.
  • 6 See The Early California Population Project: A Database Compiled and Developed at the Huntington Library. Edition 1.0. General Editor, Steven W. Hackel, Lead Compiler, Anne M. Reid (The Henry E. Huntington Library, San Marino, California, 2006). https://vww. huntington.org/ecpp for baptismal records for all of the California missions.
  • 7 For an account of the attack, see Hackel, Steven W. Children of Coyote: Missionaries of Saint Francis: Indian-Spanish Relations in Colonial California, 1769-1850. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005, 258-261.
  • 8 See Johnson, John R., “Mission Registers as Anthropological Questionnaires: Understanding Limitations of the Data.” American Indian Culture and Research Journal XII (1988): 9-30. See also, Hackel, Steven W., Children of Coyote, 2005, 449^155.
  • 9 See ECCA website: Early California Cultural Atlas: Research into the Native American Village Locations and Attributes of the Greater Los Angeles Region During the Contact Period.
  • 10 See website: http://ecai.org/ecca/ECCA-AddressingUncertaintyAmbiguity2013.html.
  • 11 See website: http://ecai.org/ecca/Videos/GreatMigrationVideo.html.

References

Bean, Lowell ed., The Ohlone Past and Present. Menlo Park, CA: Ballena Press, 1994.

Clark, Donald Thomas. Monterey County Place Names: A Geographical Dictionary. Carmel Valley, CA: Kestral Press, 1991.

Hackel, Steven W. Children of Coyote: Missionaries of Saint Francis: Indian-Spanish Relations in Colonial California, 1769-1850. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005.

Heizer, Robert, (Ed.). “California Indian Linguistic Records: The Mission Indian Vocabularies of Alphonse Pinart,” University of California Anthropological Records 15 (1952).

Hinton, Leanne. Flutes of Fire: Essays on California Indian Languages. Berkeley: Heyday Books, 1994.

Johnson, John R. “Mission Registers as Anthropological Questionnaires: Understanding Limitations of the Data,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal, XII (1988).

McCawley, William. The First Angelinos: The Gabrielino Indians of Los Angeles. Banning, CA: Malki Museum Press, 1996.

Kroeber, Alfred L. “The Chumash and Costanoan Languages,” University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology 9 (1910).

Kroeber, Alfred L. Handbook of the Indians of California. New York: Dover Press, 1976.

Milliken, Randall T. A Time of Little Choice: The Disintegration of Tribal Culture in the San Francisco Bay Area, 1769-1810. Menlo Park, CA: Ballena Press, 1995.

Shoup, Laurence H. and Randall T. Milliken, Inigo of Rancho Posolmi: The Life and Times of a Mission Indian. Menlo Park, CA: Ballena Press, 1999.

Wiener Stodder, Ann Lucy. “Mechanisms and Trends in the Decline of the Costanoan Indian Population of Central California,” Coyote Press Archives of California Prehistory 4 (1986).

Yamane Linda, ed., “A Gathering of Voices: The Native Peoples of the Central California Coast,” Santa Cruz County History Journal 5 (2002)Yamane, Linda.

 
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